Working the streets can be tough according to a former sex worker. Not only did she have to comply with demands from her pimp, but also police. The woman wants to remain anonymous for her safety. 

"Maybe I had a warrant and the officers would know that and tell me 'You take care of me, I'll take care of you,'" she said. 

This woman claims at least five Honolulu police officers pressured her to perform sexual acts. She's sharing her story because she doesn't want her traumatic experience to happen to anyone else. 

"I want people to see what they've done and I want things to change," she said. 

A recent study by the State Commission on the Status of Women and Arizona State University shared stories from 22 Hawaii women and girls.  
Kris Coffield helps other sex trafficking victims at IMUAlliance. He says he's not shocked by the results of the study. 

"I don’t think HPD is doing anything nearly enough to address the problem. This is why we work exclusively with federal law enforcement as opposed to HPD because frankly, we don’t trust HPD to handle these problems," Kris Coffield, executive director, IMUAlliance, said. 

Honolulu Police Chief Susan Ballard said HPD would fully investigate any incidents if victims would come forward with full details. This woman said she's willing to do just that to stop trafficking in Hawaii. 

Coffield estimates there are about 150 sex trafficking establishments in the state. 125 of those are in Honolulu. He says a lot of victims who call for help are from the Keeaumoku, Ala Moana area. 

"It’s very often happening in places where you don’t expect it or places you see everyday but if you’re not a sex buyer or a pimp or a victim, you probably don’t know it’s occurring there," he said. 

Coffield says his organization has rescued over 180 victims in the last 10 years, it has also provided some type of help or counseling to more than a thousand others.