WAIPAHU, Hawaii - The unexpected sight of the train on the tracks startled people going about their business in Waipahu town.

Those fortunate to get a close up view say children in the school yard waved as it went by, and people eating lunch ran outside to document the unusual sight.

"It was moving earlier we were eating and everyone inside the restaurant had to go outside and took video they were all excited and we can’t wait to wait to see how it is,” said Waipahu resident Ian Felix.

The train was pushed along the track to make sure it could handle all the clearances.

The HART timetable calls for energizing the tracks by mid-summer. That's when you can expect to see the cars move faster.

“At that time, the trains will be going on their own going back and forth. We will be testing the trains for speed braking, doors, communications and we will be doing that in mid-summer,” said HART CEO Krishniah Murthy

A total of four cars make up this first train. other two cars have already arrived on island and another two are set to be unloaded this week.

Seeing the train on the tracks is one thing, but deciding how to pay for a $3 billion short fall is another.

Lawmakers have yet to set a date for a special session following a two-week cooling off period.

The project has almost doubled in price and won’t be fully operational until 2025.

The mayor says he is getting nervous as days tick by.

"I am very hopeful we will get there. I hope when people see that we are doing here today, it brings home the reality of rail and how important it is to get all the way all the way to Ala Moana," said Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell.

The unexpected sight of the train

"It was moving earlier. We were eating and everyone inside the restaurant had to go outside and took video. They were all excited and we can’t wait to wait to see how it is," said Waipahu Resident Ian Felix.

Seeing the train on the tracks is one thing, but deciding how to pay for a three billion dollar short fall is another.

Lawmakers have yet to set a date for a special session following a two-week cooling off period.

The mayor said he is getting nervous as days tick by.

In the meantime, potential riders we talked to are getting excited about the prospect of getting on the train-- even though it is way over budget and way behind.

It has doubled in price and won’t be fully operational until 2025

Waipahu resident Al Chino told us he hopes to ride on the train with his family for outings.

He said the only train he has been on is at the Pearl Ridge monorail.

“That's the furthest I have gone. But look at this. It's modern. It's here,” said Chino.

Another resident hopes the train will make the ride to work a lot easier than it is now.

“Actually, people will be more happy. People can get to work earlier, and there's no traffic," said Shara Magoncia.

As she watches the train on its tracks, Magoncia does worry about her family who commutes from Waianae and will have to get a bus, before getting on a train.

She and others are hopeful for another alternative for west side commuters.

She believes they have certainly waited long enough.