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The Latest: Kilauea Eruption Update - Honolulu, Hawaii news, sports & weather - KITV Channel 4

The Latest: Kilauea Eruption Update

Posted: Updated:

August 15, 8:21 a.m.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that eruptive activity remains at reduced levels at Kilauea Summit and the lower east rift zone. Seismic activity at the summit continues to be low with few earthquakes. The lava pond in fissure 8 cone is mostly crusted over. Fissure 8, along with other fissures, continues to release gas. Lava continues to be reported oozing at several points along the Kapoho Bay and Ahalanui coastline creating a laze plume.

It is common for eruptions to go through periods of diminished output, or to pause completely, only to reactivate days or weeks later, or longer. Activity could occur at any time.  Residents should remain informed and heed Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

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August 14, 12:30 p.m.

Kilauea Volcano has remained quiet for over a week now, with no further collapse events at the summit, and, with the exception of a small, crusted-over pond of lava deep inside the fissure 8 cone and a few scattered ocean entries, no lava flowing in the lower East Rift Zone (LERZ).

Earthquake and deformation data show no net accumulation, withdrawal, or significant movement of subsurface magma or pressurization as would be expected if the system was building toward a resumption of activity.

It is too soon to tell if this change represents a temporary lull or the end of the LERZ eruption and/or summit collapse activity. In 1955, similar pauses of 5 and 16 days occurred during an 88-day-long LERZ eruption. During the Mauna Ulu eruption (1969-1974), a 3.5 month pause occurred in late 1971.

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August 13, 7:23 a.m.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that eruptive activity remains at reduced levels at Kilauea Summit and the lower east rift zone. Seismic activity at the summit is low with few earthquakes. The lava pond in Fissure 8 cone is mostly crusted over. Fissure 8 along with other fissures continue to release gas. Lava was reported oozing at several points along the Kapoho Bay and Ahalanui coastline creating a laze plume.

Although a lull in activity continues, it is common for eruptions to go through periods of diminished output, or to pause completely, only to reactivate days or weeks later, or longer. Activity could occur at any time.  Residents should remain informed and heed Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

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August 10, 9:12 a.m.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that eruptive activity remains at reduced levels at Kilauea Summit and the lower east rift zone from fissure 8. Seismic activity at the summit is low with few earthquakes. Field crews report a lava pond remains confined to fissure 8. HVO continues to monitor Kilauea for possible signs of reactivation.

The following guidelines remain in effect:

  • Do not access the flow field due to extreme hazard. Lava eruption could resume at any time.
  • Motorists on Highway 11 between the 28 and 32 mile marker are advised to stay on the pavement, be alert for changes in road conditions, and drive with caution.
  • The plates on Highway 130 are stable, motorists are reminded to slow down while traveling through the area.

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August 8, 7:30 a.m.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that eruptive activity remains minimal at Kilauea Summit and at the lower east rift zone from fissure 8. Seismic activity at the summit is low with few earthquakes. Field crews overnight report a lava pond confined to fissure 8. HVO continues to monitor Kilauea for possible signs of reactivation.

The Disaster Recovery Center, located at the Pahoa Community Center is closed today due to Hurricane Hector.

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August 6, 7:18 a.m.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that eruptive activity has deceased at the Kilauea summit and lower east rift eruption from fissure 8.  Seismic activity is low with few felt earthquakes at the summit.  Crews overnight in the lower east rift report only glow in fissure 8. 

HVO continues to monitor Kilauea for signs of reactivation of activity.  Several overflights are scheduled throughout the day to visually monitor the volcano.

Motorists on Highway 11 between the 28 and 32 mile marker are advised to stay on the pavement, be alert for changing roadway conditions, and drive with caution. Motorcyclists and bicyclists should proceed with extreme caution.

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August 4, 1:03 p.m.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the channel leading northeastward from the vent. No overflows were reported this morning. The lower lava channel adjacent to Kapoho cone shifted west about 0.25 km and is now feeding lava into the southwest sector of the lower flow field. Lava levels appear generally low in the channel which is incandescent at its surface to approximately 4.5 km (2.8 mi) from the vent; however, lava is still flowing farther beneath the crust to the vicinity of Kapoho Crater where it is seeping out of both sides of the channel, sometimes into adjacent vegetation starting small fires.

At the ocean entry, observers note the possible the southwestward migration of ooze-outs from the southwest portion of lava front, the northeast half of the flow’s ocean-front is inactive with no evidence of effusion into the ocean. The Pohoiki boat ramp is intact this morning. 

No other fissures are active this morning. 

Pele's hair and other lightweight volcanic glass fragments from the lava fountain at Fissure 8 continue to fall downwind of the fissure, dusting the ground within a few hundred meters (yards) of the vent. High winds may waft lighter particles to greater distances. Residents are urged to minimize exposure to these volcanic particles, which can cause skin and eye irritation similar to volcanic ash.

The most recent map of lava flows can be found at https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html 

HVO field crews are on site tracking activity as conditions allow and are reporting information to Hawaii County Civil Defense. Observations are also collected on a daily basis from cracks in the area of Highway 130; no significant changes in temperature, crack width, or gas emissions have been noted for several days.

Volcanic gas emissions remain very high. VOG information can be found at https://vog.ivhhn.org/

The ocean entry is a hazardous area. The interaction of lava with the ocean creates "laze", a corrosive seawater plume laden with hydrochloric acid and fine volcanic particles that drifts downwind and can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs. Close to the ocean entry, flying debris from explosive interaction between lava and water is a primary hazard. Additionally, submarine magma-water interaction can result in explosive activity beyond the visible lava delta, creating a hazard that extends offshore. The lava delta is unstable because it is built up to 800 m (0.5 mi) from the former coastline on unconsolidated lava fragments and sand. This loose material can easily be eroded away by surf, causing the new land to become unsupported and slide into the sea. 

Magma continues to be supplied to the Lower East Rift Zone. Seismicity remains relatively low although higher amplitude tremor is occasionally being recorded on seismic stations close to the ocean entry.

Additional ground cracking and outbreaks of lava in the area of the active fissures are possible at any time. Residents downslope of the region of fissures should remain informed and heed all Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

Kilauea Volcano Middle East Rift Zone

A white plume, assumed to be mostly steam with minor SO2 emission, has been issuing from Pu?u ?O?o nearly continuously for the past few weeks but there's no sign of volcanic activity.

Kilauea Volcano Summit

The most recent collapse event occurred two day ago, at 11:55 a.m. HST August 2, and was similar in character and magnitude to previous events. Seismicity at the summit has been elevated to 30 earthquakes per hour over the past day. Inward slumping of the rim and walls of Halema?uma?u continues.

Sulfur dioxide emissions from the volcano's summit are very low. This gas and minor amounts of ash resuspended by wind are being transported downwind. Small bursts of ash and gas may coincide with the summit collapse events. The summit region is occasionally impacted by sulfur dioxide from the lower East Rift Zone eruption.

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August 3, 12:47 p.m.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the channel leading northeastward from the vent. Multiple overflows developed late yesterday afternoon and evening, one of which headed north toward Noni Farms Road, starting a small fire. Field crews determined the advancing overflow had ceased by 21:00 HST but that fires were still burning. Further downstream overflows were concentrated in the wide lava field west and south-southwest of Kapoho cone, also igniting small fires in adjacent vegetation.

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August 2, 8:10 a.m.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports earthquakes continue at the Kilauea Summit.  Fissure 8 continues to erupt sending lava flows into the ocean at Ahalanui; creating a large laze plume. 

State Highways reports no new cracks on Highway 11, but request motorists stay on the pavement and be alert for changes in roadway conditions between mile markers 28 and 32.

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3:56 p.m.

HVO reports that earthquakes continue at Kilauea summit and fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel, sending flows to the ocean at Ahalanui and creating a large laze plume. No overflows were reported this morning. The margin of the flow at the ocean entry has not advanced and remains approximately 500 feet from the Pohoiki boat ramp.

State Highways reports no new cracks on Highway 11 after the 8:00 a.m. collapse event at Halemaumau crater. Between mile marker 28 and 32, motorists are advised to stay on the pavement, be alert for changing roadway conditions, and drive with caution. Motorcyclists and bicyclists should proceed with extreme caution.

**Reminder: There will not be a test of the Outdoor Warning Siren System for the month of August. Testing will resume Tuesday, September 4, 2018.**

The following guidelines remain in effect:

  • Check all utility connections of water, gas, and electricity for potential damage from earthquake activity.
  • Do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard. Be aware that channel overflows and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field.
  • The ocean entry continues to produce a laze plume. Take precautions and stay out of the plume to avoid exposure to hydrochloric acid and glass particles, which can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawaii County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption.

  • The Disaster Recovery Center has moved and is now at the Pahoa Community Center, located at 15-3022 Kauhale street, Pahoa. Hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays.
  • Access placards are available at the Civil Defense office located at 920 Ululani Street in Hilo.

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July 31, 1:48 p.m.

Around eight Tuesday morning, parts of the crater wall collapsed. That movement was equivalent to a magnitude 5.4 earthquake.Another movement around 12:30 Tuesday morning equivalent to a magnitude 4.5 earthquake shook the summit. No tsunami threat.

At the coast, the south edge of the lava flow has not advanced westward in the past day, and remains less than 175 m (0.1 mi) from the Pohoiki boat ramp in Isaac Hale Park.

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4:48 p.m. 

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that earthquakes continue at Kilauea summit and fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel, sending flows to the ocean at Ahalanui and creating a large laze plume. This morning, HVO field crews report low lava levels in the channel and no overflows. The margin of the flow at the ocean entry has not advanced and remains approximately 500 feet from the Pohoiki boat ramp.

State Highways reports no new cracks on Highway 11, but requests motorists between mile marker 28 and 32 stay on the pavement, be alert for changing roadway conditions, and drive with caution. Motorcyclists and bicyclists should proceed with extreme caution.

**Note: Tomorrow, July 31, from 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm, Hawaii Police Department will be shutting down Highway 11 between Kukui Camp Road and North Kulani Road in Mountain View for investigative purposes. No traffic will be allowed in either direction during this time.**

The following guidelines remain in effect:

  • Check all utility connections of water, gas, and electricity for potential damage from earthquake activity.
  • Do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard. Be aware that channel overflows and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field.
  • The ocean entry continues to produce a laze plume. Take precautions and stay out of the plume to avoid exposure to hydrochloric acid and glass particles, which can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawaii County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption.

  • The Disaster Recovery Center has moved and is now at the Pahoa Community Center, located at 15-3016 Kauhale St., Pahoa. Hours of operation are 8 am to 6 pm weekdays and 8 am to 4 pm on Saturdays.
  • Access placards are available at the Civil Defense office located at 920 Ululani Street in Hilo.

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July 30, 7:21 a.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports a 4.1 magnitude occurred on the south flank of Kilauea last night just after 10 PM that was felt as far away as Kalapana to Hilo. No damage was reported. 

Fissure 8 continues to erupt into the channel sending lava flows into the ocean at Ahalanui, creating a large laze plume. HVO field crews report fluctuations in the channel level with spillovers occurring locally along the channel. 

Yesterday’s flyover reports the margin of the flow remains approximately 500 feet from the Pohoiki Boat Ramp at Isaac Hale Park with the main ocean entry approximately 0.75 miles northeast of Pohoiki Boat Ramp.

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July 27, 11:58 a.m.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel, sending flows to the ocean at Ahalanui and creating a large laze plume. HVO field crews report fluctuations in the channel level with small overflows occurring in the upper portion of the channel continued overnight.

As of yesterday’s overflight, the western margin of the flow near Pohoiki has not advanced significantly westward so the flow remains approximately 500 feet from the Pohoiki boat ramp in Isaac Hale Park.

State Highways requests motorists on Highway 11 between mile marker 28 and 32 stay on the pavement and be alert for changing roadway conditions.

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July 26, 11:50 a.m.

Lava is now about 450 feet away from Pohoiki Boat Ramp in Issac Hale Park. 

USGS officials say the flow appears to be slowing down, but it is still unpredictable.

Relatives of Isaac Hale tell Island News they hope the area, including Hale's home, will be spared.

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July 25, 2018 9.:00 a.m.

Yesterday’s overflight reports the southern margin of the flow is within 150 yards of the Isaac Hale / Pohoiki Boat Ramp.

State Highways requests motorists on Highway 11 between the 28 and 32 Mile Markers stay on the pavement and to be on the alert for changing roadway conditions.

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5:43 p.m.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that earthquakes continue at Kilauea’s summit, and fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel, sending flows to the ocean at Ahalanui and creating a large laze plume. 

Over the last day, ooze outs were reported along the western edge of the lava flow, which is now about 500 feet from the Pohoiki boat ramp in Isaac Hale Park.

State Highways requests motorists on Highway 11 between mile marker 28 and 32 stay on the pavement and be alert for changing roadway conditions.

The following guidelines remain in effect:

  • Check all utility connections of water, gas, and electricity for potential damage from earthquake activity.
  • Do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard. Be aware that channel overflows and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field.
  • The ocean entry continues to produce a laze plume. Take precautions and stay out of the plume to avoid exposure to hydrochloric acid and glass particles, which can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawaii County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption.

  • The Disaster Recovery Center, located at the Keaau High School Gym, is open daily from 8am to 6pm weekdays and 8am to 4pm on Saturdays. If you need a ride, buses run between the two shelters and the Disaster Recovery Center.
  • Access placards are available at the Civil Defense office located at 920 Ululani Street in Hilo.

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July 24, 7:13 a.m.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports a collapse event with energy equal to 5.5 magnitude earthquake has occurred at Halemaumau Crater at 6:41 AM. 

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center reports there is no tsunami threat to the island of Hawaii.

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7:24 p.m.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that eruption activity continues from fissure 8 into the lava channel, sending flows to the ocean entry at Ahalanui and producing a large laze plume.

Following last night’s collapse event at the summit, overflows were reported northwest of Kapoho Cone but stalled before threatening any structures.

The southern flow margin at the ocean entry remains unchanged.

The Volcano area is experiencing poor air quality due to easterly winds.

The earthquake activity in the area continues to cause road damage on Highway 11.

Motorists are advised to be alert for changing road conditions, especially between MM 28 and 32. 

The following guidelines remain in effect:

  • Check all utility connections of water, gas, and electricity for potential damage from earthquake activity.
  • In areas of high SO2, limit outdoor exposure and stay indoors with the windows closed. If the air quality becomes too poor, leave the area.
  • Do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard. Be aware that channel overflows and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawaii County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption.

  • The Disaster Recovery Center, located at the Keaau High School Gym, is open daily from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays. If you need a ride, buses run between the two shelters and the Disaster Recovery Center.

Access placards are available at the Civil Defense office located at 920 Ululani Street in Hilo.

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11:55 a.m.

The National Weather Service has forecast a slight disruption in the trade winds, causing surface winds to be more easterly than normal. Due to this current wind pattern, Volcano is experiencing high levels of SO2. Other areas downwind of fissure 8 are also susceptible to poor air quality.

Due to the potential air quality hazards, take the following precautions:

  • Limit outdoor exposure and stay indoors with all windows closed.  
  • Turn on an air filtration system.
  • If the air quality becomes too poor, leave the area.
  • The latest air quality measurements from the University of Hawaii’s Vog Measurement and Prediction Project can be found here: http://mkwc.ifa.hawaii.edu/vmap/

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July 23, 9:11 a.m.

The eruption from fissure 8 keeps the lava flowing into the ocean at Ahalanui. 

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory says the activity from that fissure continues to feed into the lava channel. The flow is about a quarter mile from Isaac Hale Pohoiki boat ramp. 

Meanwhile, earthquakes continue at the Kilauea Summit. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports a collapse event at Halema'uma'u Crater Sunday night had energy equal to a 5.3 magnitude earthquake. 

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center reports there is no tsunami threat to the island of Hawaii.

Drivers, prepare to slow down to 25 miles per hour in the volcano area. There are cracks in the road on Highway 11 between the 28 and 30 mile markers. Drivers are urged to use extreme caution in the area.   

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July 22, 8:00 a.m.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that eruption activity continues from Fissure 8 into the lava channel flowing to the ocean entry at Ahalanui producing a large laze plume.  As of this morning’s overflight report, the southern margin of the flow is approximately 0.25 miles from Isaac Hale/Pohoiki Boat Ramp.  Earthquakes continue at the Kilauea summit.

On roadway updates for the Volcano area, State Highways reports that a speed limit of 25 miles per hour is in effect on Highway 11between the 28 and 30 Mile Markers due to cracks in the road.  Motorists are advised to stay on the pavement and be on the alert for changing roadway conditions.

The following policies remain in effect:

-Do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard.  Be aware that channel overflows and breakouts are possible on the active flow field.

-The ocean entry continues to produce a “laze” plume.  Take precautions and stay out of the plume to avoid exposure to hydrochloric acid and glass particles which can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.

-Residents are reminded to check utility connections of gas, water and electricity after earthquakes.

July 21, 6:00 a.m.

On roadway updates for the Volcano area, State Highways reports that a speed limit of 25 miles per hour is in effect on Highway 11 between the 28 and 30 Mile Markers due to cracks in the road.  Motorists are advised to stay on the pavement and be on the alert for changing roadway conditions.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that eruption activity continues from Fissure 8 into the lava channel flowing to the ocean entry at Ahalanui producing a large laze plume. As of yesterday’s overflight report, the southern margin of the flow is approximately 0.25 miles from Isaac Hale / Pohoiki Boat Ramp.

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July 20, 8:51 a.m.

On roadway updates for the Volcano area, State Highways reports that a speed limit of 25 miles per hour is in effect on Highway 11 between the 28 and 30 Mile Markers due to cracks in the road.  Motorists are advised to stay on the pavement and be on the alert for cracks in the road and to exercise caution.

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July 19, 4:16 p.m.

The southern margin of the flow is 0.3 miles from Isaac Hale/Pohoiki boat ramp. #KilaueaEruption

There will be a community meeting for the Kau District at the Pahala Community Center at 6 this evening to discuss the ongoing event at Kilauea.

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July 18, 6:51 a.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that eruption activity continues at Fissure 8 and is producing a channel flow to the ocean at Ahalanui. Lava is entering the ocean and producing a large laze plume.   

A collapse explosion from Halemaumau at 1:28 am resulted in lava flow increase into Leilani Estates with additional structures destroyed.

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July 17, 9:32 a.m.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the channel heading northeast toward Kapoho into the ocean near Ahalanui. 

The following policies remain in effect:

  • Be aware that spill overs of the channel and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field.
  • Do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard.

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July 16, 6:05 p.m.

The next Pahoa community meeting is at 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, July 17, at the Pahoa High School cafeteria.  

Representatives form Hawaii County Civil Defense and the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory will be there to answer questions regarding the current eruption activity and response.

Several other county and state resources agencies will be available as well.

Thus far, 706 structures have been destroyed and 8000 acres,12.5 square miles, of land have been covered with lava flows since the eruption onset.

Please attend if you live in the area or want to discuss your concerns with these agency representatives.

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12:05 p.m.

Kilauea Volcano Lower East Rift Zone

Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel leading northeastward from the vent. Lava levels in the upper channel increased for several hours after the summit collapse-explosion event yesterday at 7:08 p.m. and returned to lower levels this morning. A short-lived overflow of the channel near the vent spread east-southeast, but did not advance beyond the existing flow field. The channelized ?a?a flow west of Kapoho Crater continues to be the main ocean entry at the southern edge of the flow front this morning. The southern margin of the flow was about 1 km (0.6 mi) from Isaac Hale Park this morning. Despite no visible surface connection to the fissure 8 channel, lava continues to ooze out at several points on the 6 km (3.7 mi) wide flow front into the ocean.

No other fissures are active this morning. 

Pele's hair and other lightweight volcanic glass fragments from the lava fountain at Fissure 8 continue to fall downwind of the fissure, dusting the ground within a few hundred meters (yards) of the vent. High winds may waft lighter particles to greater distances. Residents are urged to minimize exposure to these volcanic particles, which can cause skin and eye irritation similar to volcanic ash.

The most recent map of lava flows can be found at https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html 

HVO field crews are on site tracking activity as conditions allow and are reporting information to Hawaii County Civil Defense. Observations are also collected on a daily basis from cracks in the area of Highway 130; no changes in temperature, crack width, or gas emissions have been noted for several days.

Volcanic gas emissions remain very high and continue to increase. VOG information can be found at https://vog.ivhhn.org/

The ocean entry is a hazardous area. The interaction of lava with the ocean creates "laze", a corrosive seawater plume laden with hydrochloric acid and fine volcanic particles that drifts downwind and can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs. Close to the ocean entry, flying debris from explosive interaction between lava and water is a primary hazard. Additionally, submarine magma-water interaction can result in explosive activity beyond the visible lava delta, creating a hazard that extends offshore. The lava delta is unstable because it is built up to 800 m (0.5 mi) from the former coastline on unconsolidated lava fragments and sand. This loose material can easily be eroded away by surf, causing the new land to become unsupported and slide into the sea. 

Magma continues to be supplied to the Lower East Rift Zone. Seismicity remains relatively low although higher amplitude tremor is occasionally being recorded on seismic stations close to the ocean entry.

Additional ground cracking and outbreaks of lava in the area of the active fissures are possible at any time. Residents downslope of the region of fissures should remain informed and heed all Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

Kilauea Volcano Summit

Earthquakes in the summit area have resumed following yesterday's collapse/explosion event at 7:08 p.m. HST, which had an energy equivalent to a magnitude-5.3 earthquake. The current rate of earthquakes ranges from 25-35/hr and is expected to continue leading up to another collapse/explosion event, which is expected to occur this evening or early Sunday morning. Inward slumping of the rim and walls of Halema?uma?u continues in response to the ongoing subsidence at the summit. 

Sulfur dioxide emissions from the volcano's summit are very low. This gas and minor amounts of ash resuspended by wind are being transported downwind. Small bursts of ash and gas may coincide with the summit collapse/explosion events. The summit region is occasionally impacted by sulfur dioxide from the lower East Rift Zone eruption.

Forecasts of ashfall under forecast wind conditions: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/ash_information.html

Information on volcanic ash hazards and how to prepare for ash fall maybe found at http://www.ivhhn.org/information#ash (health impacts) OR https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanic_ash/ (other impacts).  

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July 14, 6:25 a.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel heading northeast from the vent toward Kapoho.  The majority of the flow is now heading South at Kapoho Cone toward Ahalanui.  The National Weather Service is forecasting increased rainfall with a chance of thunderstorms over the weekend.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawaii County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption. The Disaster Recovery Center is open daily from 8am to 6pm weekdays and 8am to 4pm weekends, and is located at the Keaau High School Gym. If you need a ride, buses run between the two shelters and the Disaster Recovery Center.

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July 13, 8:24 a.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel heading northeast from the vent toward Kapoho.  The majority of the flow is now heading South at Kapoho Cone toward Pohoiki.  The National Weather Service is forecasting increased rainfall with a chance of thunderstorms over the weekend.

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July 12, 10:54 a.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel heading northeast from the vent toward Kapoho.  An overflight this morning has confirmed that Ahalanui Park and Kua O Ka La School have been covered by lava.

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July 11, 8:37 a.m.

5.3 magnitude volcanic eruption. No tsunami threat to the state.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel heading northeast from the vent. A lobe moving around the west side of Kapoho Cone remains active and small brushfires are reported along the edges. Lava appears to be reoccupying the channel leading to the ocean entry where multiple fingers of lava are active. 

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July 10, 11:03 a.m.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava steadily into the perched channel leading northeastward from the vent. Disruptions to the mid-channel occurred yesterday afternoon producing localized overflows along the margins of the flowfield, mostly atop earlier lavas. A significant overflow north of the cinder quarry advancing yesterday and last night towards Cinder Rd. has stalled. An overflow lobe moving around the west side of Kapoho Cone remains active this morning and small brushfires are reported along the margins. Downstream, lava appears to be reoccupying the channel leading to the ocean entry were multiple fingers of lava are active. The southern margin of the ocean entry shows little sign of movement.

Yesterday's channel disruption and overflows were caused by blockages that developed along the channel. Additional blockages and resulting overflows are likely to occur as long as the activity continues.

Fissure 22 continues to exhibit weak spattering. No other fissures are active.

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July 9, 9:36 a.m.

Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory reports a collapse/explosive event with energy equal to a 5.4 magnitude earthquake has occurred at Halemaumau Crater at 9:21 AM. 

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center reports there is no Tsunami Threat to the Island of Hawaii.

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July 8, 11:43 a.m.

The eruption in the lower East Rift Zone (LERZ) continues with no significant change during the past 24 hours.

Fountains from Fissure 8 spatter cone continue to supply lava to the open channel with only small, short-lived overflows. The spatter cone is now about 55 m (180 ft) tall at its highest point, and fountains rarely rise above that point. As shown by the July 06 thermal map of the flow field, the main lava channel no longer directly enters the ocean—the open channel flow ends about 2 km (1.2 mi) inland of the coast. Lava continues to enter the ocean, however, from multiple points along the entire ocean entry area, primarily along the northern section. In addition, multiple ooze-outs fed flows on the north and the southwest edge of the main ‘a‘a flow field but neither had lava actively entering the ocean.

Fissure 22 was weakly spattering overnight.

Pele's hair and other lightweight volcanic glass fragments from the lava fountain at Fissure 8 continue to fall downwind of the fissure, dusting the ground within a few hundred meters (yards) of the vent. High winds may waft lighter particles to greater distances. Residents are urged to minimize exposure to these volcanic particles, which can cause skin and eye irritation similar to volcanic ash.

The most recent map of lava flows can be found at https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

HVO field crews are on site tracking the fountains, lava flows, and spattering from Fissure 8 as conditions allow and are reporting information to Hawaii County Civil Defense. Observations are also collected on a daily basis from cracks in the area of Highway 130; no changes in temperature, crack width, or gas emissions have been noted for several days.

Volcanic gas emissions remain very high from fissures 8 and 22. Continuing trade wind conditions are expected to bring VOG to the southern and western parts of the Island of Hawai`i. VOG information can be found at https://vog.ivhhn.org/

The ocean entry is a hazardous area. Venturing too close to an ocean entry on land or the ocean exposes you to flying debris from sudden explosive interaction between lava and water. Also, the lava delta is unstable because it is built on unconsolidated lava fragments and sand. This loose material can easily be eroded away by surf, causing the new land to become unsupported and slide into the sea. Additionally, the interaction of lava with the ocean creates "laze", a corrosive seawater plume laden with hydrochloric acid and fine volcanic particles that can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.

Magma continues to be supplied to the Lower East Rift Zone. Seismicity remains relatively low in the area with numerous small magnitude earthquakes and low amplitude background tremor. Low amplitude tremor increased slightly on June 29 associated with renewed activity at Fissure 22. Higher amplitude tremor is occasionally being recorded on seismic stations close to the ocean entry.

Additional ground cracking and outbreaks of lava in the area of the active fissures are possible. Residents downslope of the region of fissures should heed all Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

Kilauea Volcano Summit

Another collapse-explosion event at Kilauea's summit occurred at 2:55 a.m. HST on July 8 with the equivalent energy of a magnitude-5.4 earthquake. Seismicity dropped abruptly afterwards and remains low at this time. Seismic activity is expected to increase during the next several hours and culminate in another collapse explosion on Monday. Inward slumping of the rim and walls of Halema?uma?u continues in response to the ongoing subsidence at the summit. 

Sulfur dioxide emissions from the volcano's summit have dropped to levels that are about half those measured prior to the onset of the current episode of eruptive activity. This gas and minor amounts of ash are being transported downwind, with small bursts of ash and gas accompanying intermittent explosive activity.

--

July 6, 12:00 p.m.

Fissure 8 continues to produce a heavy lava flow producing a broad ocean entry along the shoreline, and continues to expand into Kapoho Beach Lots and the Four Corners intersection.  

A reminder to the public, Four corners and Kapoho Beach Lots are closed to any access.

Only four of the fifty houses in the Kapoho Beach Lots subdivision are still standing. 

The total number of homes lost in lower Puna since the eruption started back on May 3rd is now around 700.

Highway 11 near the golf course is down to one lane because of a sinkhole. Hawaii Volcanoes National Park rangers were on site Wednesday night directing traffic.

The Department of Transportation blames earthquake damage for the sinkhole, which is 15 by 20 feet in size. 

One lane will remain open unless conditions get worse. Work to fill the hole began Friday.

--

1:51 p.m.

Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory reports a collapse/explosive event with energy equal to a 5.3 magnitude earthquake has occurred at Halemaumau Crater at 1:20 PM. 

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center reports there is no Tsunami Threat to the Island of Hawaii.

--

July 5, 7:23 a.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to be very active and is feeding a lava channel to the ocean at Kapoho. The flow is producing a broad ocean entry along the shoreline, and is also oozing fresh lava at Kapoho Beach Lots and a flow near the Four Corners area.

The following policies are issued.

  • Due to the breakouts of lava near Four Corners and within Kapoho Beach Lots persons are reminded that these areas are closed to any access.
  • Be aware that spill overs of the channel and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field, do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawaii County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption.

  • The Disaster Recovery Center is open daily from 8am to 8pm, and is located at the Keaau High School Gym. If you need a ride, buses will resume running between the two shelters and the Disaster Recovery Center between 7:30 am and 9:00 pm.
  • For more resources to help you recover from this disaster, please visit the county website. (http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/lava-related/)

--

July 4, 11 a.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory: Collapse and explosion event at Kilauea's Summit caused a 5.4 magnitude earthquake, no tsunami threat 

6:00pm

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to be very active and is feeding a lava channel to the ocean at Kapoho. The flow is producing a broad ocean entry along the shoreline, and is also oozing fresh lava at Kapoho Beach Lots. Fissure 22 is also active and producing a short flow.  

Gas emissions from the fissure eruption and laze at the ocean entry continue to be very high. The National Weather Service reports trade winds will push vog to the south and west side of the island.

Highway 130 will re-open to all traffic beginning at 8:00 AM tomorrow, July 3. 

  • Kamaili Road will be open to residents only
  • Highway 137 will be open from Highway 130 north to Opihikao road
  • McKenzie State Recreation Area and the new lava flow areas remain closed
  • Vacation Rentals as well as all businesses in the Kalapana area can resume normal operations
     

There will be a community meeting July 3rd at 5:00 PM at the Pahoa High School cafeteria.

July 2, 2018, 2:03 p.m.

A Pahoa community meeting regarding the eruption will be held Tuesday, July 3 at 5:00 PM at the Pahoa High School cafeteria. 

An American Sign Language interpreter will be available at the meeting.

--

July 1, 2018

This is a Civil Defense Message for Sunday, July 1 at 6:00 a.m. 

HVO reports that Fissure 8 continues to be very active and is feeding a lava channel to the ocean at Kapoho.

The flow is producing a broad ocean entry along the shoreline, and is also oozing fresh lava at Kapoho Beach Lots.

Fissure 22 is also active and producing a short flow. 

Gas emissions from the fissure eruption and laze at the ocean entry continue to be very high.

The National Weather Service reports trade winds will push vog to the south and west side of the island.

Due to volcanic activity, the following polices are in effect:

  • Due to active lava near houses in Kapoho, access by residents is not allowed.
  • Due to frequent earthquakes, residents in the Volcano area are advised to monitor utility connections of gas, electricity, and water after earthquakes. 

--

9:36 a.m.

The eruption in the lower East Rift Zone (LERZ) continues with no significant change during the past 24 hours.

Fountains from Fissure 8 spatter cone continue to supply lava to the open channel with intermittent small, short-lived overflows. These overflows rarely extend beyond the existing flow field. No active overflows were observed during this morning's helicopter overflight.The spatter cone is now about 55 m (180 ft) tall at its highest point, and fountains rarely rise above that point. At the coast, the northern margin of the flow field is still oozing pasty lava at several points in the area of Kapoho Beach Lots. Lava was entering the sea over a broad area this morning primarily on the northern side of the entry area. As shown by the June 29 thermal map of the flow field, the lava channel has crusted over about 0.8 km (0.5 mi) inland of the ocean entry; lava oozing from the flow's molten interior into the ocean along most of its broad front.

Fissure 22 is spattering about 50-80 m above conical spatter cone and feeding a short lava flow that is moving slowly to the northeast along the edge of earlier flows.

Pele's hair and other lightweight volcanic glass fragments from the lava fountain at Fissure 8 continue to fall downwind of the fissure, dusting the ground within a few hundred meters (yards) of the vent. High winds may waft lighter particles to greater distances. Residents are urged to minimize exposure to these volcanic particles, which can cause skin and eye irritation similar to volcanic ash.

The most recent map of lava flows can be found at https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

HVO field crews are on site tracking the fountains, lava flows, and spattering from Fissure 8 as conditions allow and are reporting information to Hawaii County Civil Defense. Observations are also collected on a daily basis from cracks in the area of Highway 130; no changes in temperature, crack width, or gas emissions have been noted for several days.

Volcanic gas emissions remain very high from Fissure 8 and 22 eruptions. Continuing trade wind conditions are expected to bring VOG to the southern and western parts of the Island of Hawaii. VOG information can be found at https://vog.ivhhn.org/

The ocean entry is a hazardous area. Venturing too close to an ocean entry on land or the ocean exposes you to flying debris from sudden explosive interaction between lava and water. Also, the lava delta is unstable because it is built on unconsolidated lava fragments and sand. This loose material can easily be eroded away by surf, causing the new land to become unsupported and slide into the sea. Additionally, the interaction of lava with the ocean creates "laze", a corrosive seawater plume laden with hydrochloric acid and fine volcanic particles that can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.

Magma continues to be supplied to the Lower East Rift Zone. Seismicity remains relatively low in the area with numerous small magnitude earthquakes and low amplitude background tremor. Low amplitude tremor increased slightly on June 29 associated with renewed activity at Fissure 22. Higher amplitude tremor is occasionally being recorded on seismic stations close to the ocean entry.

Additional ground cracking and outbreaks of lava in the area of the active fissures are possible. Residents downslope of the region of fissures should heed all Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

Kilauea Volcano Summit

After the collapse/explosive event at 02:51 PM HST yesterday, seismicity dropped abruptly from a high of 25-30 earthquakes per hour (many in the magnitude 2-3 range) prior to the collapse explosion down to 5 or fewer earthquakes per hour afterwards. This morning, the summit seismicity is at 25-35 earthquakes per hour as we await the next collapse/explosive event. Inward slumping of the rim and walls of Halema?uma?u continues in response to ongoing subsidence at the summit.

Sulfur dioxide emissions from the volcano's summit have dropped to levels that are about half those measured prior to the onset of the current episode of eruptive activity. This gas and minor amounts of ash are being transported downwind, with small bursts of ash and gas accompanying intermittent explosive activity.

 

June 29

The official number of homes destroyed by lava to date is now 668. Those numbers were gathered by the Housing and Real Property Tax division with aerial surveys.

6:00 a.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to erupt with a full lava channel flowing to the ocean at Kapoho. Gas emissions from the fissure eruption and at the ocean entry laze plumes continue to be very high. Currently, there is no immediate threat, but persons near the active flow should be prepared and heed warnings from Civil Defense. 

To report your home or property damaged or destroyed, please call the Hawaii Real Property Tax Office at 961-8201. To report your home or property inaccessible due to lava isolation or mandatory evacuation, please call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

A community meeting at the Pahoa High School Cafeteria will be held today at 5 p.m.

5:15 p.m.

USGS reported the lava flow front has advanced between 800 and 900 meters in the past five days and is now 1,200 meters, about three-fourths of a mile, from Ahalanui Beach Park.

They estimated that if the flow continues on its present path at its present pace, the lava could reach the iconic park within a week.

--

June 25, 7:32 a.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to erupt with a full channel flowing to the ocean at Kapoho. Currently, there is no immediate threat, but persons near the active flow should be prepared and heed warnings from Civil Defense. 

Due to frequent earthquake activity, residents in the Volcano area are advised to monitor utility connections of gas, electricity, and water after earthquakes. 

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawaii County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption. The Disaster Recovery Center is open daily from 8am to 8pm, and is located at the Keaau High School Gym.

Tropic Care 2018 will provide free medical, dental and eye care today, June 25th, through Thursday, June 28th, at Kea’au High School between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Tropic Care is open to everyone, regardless of whether or not they are affected by the disaster.

--

June 24, 4:18 p.m.

The Hawaii Volcano Observatory reports that a collapse/explosion event occurred at approximately 04:12 p.m. The energy released from the event is equivalent to a magnitude 5.3 on the Richter scale and did NOT cause a tsunami.

The event resulted in a small ash plume mostly steam that may affect the surrounding areas. Wind may carry the ash plume to the southwest toward Wood Valley, Pahala and Ocean View. 

  • The danger from this eruption is ash fallout.  The major response is to protect yourself from fallout.
  • If you are at home, stay indoors with the windows closed.  Turn on your radio and listen for updates from authorities.
  • If you are in your car, keep the windows closed.  Ash fallout may cause poor driving conditions, due to limited visibility and slippery driving conditions.  Drive with extreme caution, or pull over and park.  
  • After the hazard has passed, do check your home, and especially your catchment system for any impact that may affect your water quality.

June 23, 6:00 a.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to erupt with a full channel flowing to the ocean at Kapoho.  Currently, there is no immediate threat, but persons near the active flow should heed warnings from Civil Defense.  Due to frequent earthquake activity, residents in the Volcano area are advised to monitor utility connections of gas, electricity and water after earthquakes. 

You may monitor vog and air quality conditions online using the Hawaii Interagency Vog Information Dashboard, linked on the Civil Defense website. (vog.ivhhn.org/)

The FEMA Disaster Recovery Center is open daily from 8am to 8pm, and is located at the Keaau High School Gym.

Free medical, dental and eye care will be available today, June 23 at “Tropic Care 2018” at Kea’au High School between 8am and 5pm. Tropic Care will also hold a free legal clinic today only from 9 am to 2:30 pm. Tropic Care is open to everyone, regardless of whether or not they are affected by the Kilauea eruption.

June 21, 1:42

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center reports that a gas explosion that occurred at approximately 1:13 p.m. caused a blast wave that was NOT large enough to cause a tsunami for the Island of Hawaii.  There is NO tsunami threat for the island of Hawaii.

Preliminary data indicates that the blast wave measuring a magnitude 5.3 was centered in the summit region of Kilauea.

Hawaii Volcano Observatory reports that fissure 8 continues to erupt with a full channel flowing to the ocean in one major entry. Fissures 6, 15 and 16 continue producing minor spattering. 

Trade winds are forcasted to return Thursday, pushing vog to the southwest.

--

June 20, 9:46 a.m.

The eruption in the lower East Rift Zone continues with little change.

Lava fountains from the Fissure 8 spatter cone continue to feed the established channel that transports lava to the ocean at the Kapoho coastline, where several entries are active. Upslope, short-lived overflows occur periodically but generally do not travel beyond the existing flow field. Fissures 6, 15, and 16 are periodically oozing lava and steaming.

At 4:22 a.m. HST, a gas and ash emission from a collapse event occurred at Kilauea's summit, producing a small plume that was blown downwind at less than 6,000 ft above sea level. Inward slumping of the rim and walls of Halema?uma?u continues in response to ongoing subsidence at the summit.

--

10:57 p.m.

Kilauea Volcano Lower East Rift Zone

The eruption in the Lower East Rift Zone continues with little change.

Fountains 165-246 ft. high at Fissure 8 continue to feed the established channel that transports lava to the ocean at the Kapoho coastline, where several entries are active.

Up slope, short-lived overflows occur periodically but generally do not travel beyond the existing flow field.

Fissures 6, 15, and 16 are periodically oozing lava and steaming. 

Pele's hair and other lightweight volcanic glass fragments from the lava fountain at Fissure 8 continue to fall downwind of the fissure, dusting the ground within a few hundred meters (yards) of the vent. High winds may waft lighter particles to greater distances. Residents are urged to minimize exposure to these volcanic particles, which can cause skin and eye irritation similar to volcanic ash.

The most recent map of lava flows can be found at https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

HVO field crews are on site tracking the fountains, lava flows, and spattering from Fissure 8 as conditions allow and are reporting information to Hawaii County Civil Defense. Observations are also collected on a daily basis from cracks in the area of Highway 130; no changes in temperature, crack width, or gas emissions have been noted for several days.

Volcanic gas emissions remain very high from Fissure 8 eruptions. Winds are expected to bring VOG to the central, south, and western parts of the Island of Hawaii. VOG information can be found at https://vog.ivhhn.org/

The ocean entry is a hazardous area. Venturing too close to an ocean entry on land or the ocean exposes you to flying debris from sudden explosive interaction between lava and water. Also, the lava delta is unstable because it is built on unconsolidated lava fragments and sand. This loose material can easily be eroded away by surf, causing the new land to become unsupported and slide into the sea. Additionally, the interaction of lava with the ocean creates "laze", a corrosive seawater plume laden with hydrochloric acid and fine volcanic particles that can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.

Magma continues to be supplied to the Lower East Rift Zone. Seismicity remains relatively low in the area with numerous small magnitude earthquakes and low amplitude background tremor. Higher amplitude tremor is occasionally being recorded on seismic stations close to the ocean entry.

Additional ground cracking and outbreaks of lava in the area of the active fissures are possible. Residents downslope of the region of fissures should heed all Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

Kilauea Volcano Summit

The 5:05 a.m. HST subsurface explosion at Kilauea's summit this morning was followed by 4 hours of low seismicity (<10 events/hour). Seismicity gradually increased thereafter reaching, 30-35 events per hour by 10:00 p.m. HST. If the pattern of the past several days holds, another subsurface explosion is likely within the next few hours. Inward slumping of the rim and walls of Halema?uma?u continues in response to ongoing subsidence at the summit.

Sulfur dioxide emissions from the volcano's summit have dropped to levels that are about half those measured prior to the onset of the current episode of eruptive activity. This gas and minor amounts of ash are being transported downwind, with small bursts of ash and gas accompanying intermittent explosive activity.

For forecasts of where ash would fall under forecast wind conditions, please consult the Ash3D model output here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/ash_information.html

Information on volcanic ash hazards and how to prepare for ash fall maybe found at http://www.ivhhn.org/information#ash (health impacts) OR https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanic_ash/ (other impacts)

--

5:57 p.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to erupt with a full channel flowing to the ocean at multiple points.  Fissure 15 has mild spattering and Fissure 6 is oozing.

The National Weather Service says light winds overnight will push emissions into the interior of the Big Island, including Hilo, northern and western parts of the Big Island. Trade winds are expected to build by Thursday.

The following resources are available to residents of Hawai‘i County who suffered damage or losses from the Kilauea volcanic eruption and recent earthquakes:

  • A FEMA Disaster Recovery Center is open daily from 8am to 8pm, and is located at the Keaau High School Gym
  • The Hawai’i Dept. of Health will be holding Volcanic Ash and Vog Community Meetings tomorrow at Konawaena Elementary School in Kealakekua beginning at 5 p.m. and Thursday  at Waikoloa Elementary & Middle School Cafeteria beginning at 6 p.m.
  • Tropic Care 2018 continues tomorrow with free medical, dental and eye care at Kea’au High School from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. 

--

June 19, 10:02 a.m.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt with a full channel and one major ocean entry at Kapoho.  HVO continues to monitor three other fissures that are weakly active.

The National Weather Service reports that today through Thursday light winds are expected to push vog into the saddle and interior areas of the Big Island. Trade winds are predicted to return on Friday.

As of yesterday afternoon 817 people have registered with the Federal Emergency Management Agency for assistance either on line or at the Disaster Recovery Center or DRC.

  • The DRC, is open daily from 8am to 8pm, and is located at the Keaau High School Gym. 
  • Tropic Care 2018 continues today and tomorrow with free medical, dental and eye care at Kea’au High School from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m.  Additional screening days are scheduled for the coming weeks.
  • There will be a community meeting at the Pahoa High School Cafeteria today at 5 p.m. An American Sign Language interpreter will be on hand.

?--

June 18, 6:55 a.m.

Explosion at the Kilauea Summit.  The energy is like a 5.3 magnitude earthquake.  No tsunami is expected.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports Fissure 8 continues to be very active with a fast moving channelized flow entering the ocean at Kapoho Bay. The vent is producing a large SO2 plume and a large laze plume at the ocean entry.  Seismic activity continues at Kilauea Summit.

On the Leilani Eruption:

  • 5,914 acres or nine and a quarter square miles of land has now been impacted.
  • 533 homes have been destroyed.

--

June 17, 6:51 a.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that an ash eruption at the Kilauea Summit occurred at apx. 6:26 a.m. An ash plume was generated. The wind is blowing in the southwest direction and ash may affect the areas of Volcano and Kau.

The following advice is provided for your information.

  • If you are at home, stay indoors with the windows closed. If you are outside seek cover.
  • If you are in the car, keep the windows closed. Ash fallout may cause poor driving conditions, due to limited visibility and slippery driving conditions. Drive with extreme caution or pull over and park.
  • After the hazard has passed, do check your home and especially your catchment system for any impact that may affect your water quality.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that the eruption activity continues at Fissure 8 in the lower East Rift Zone.  Lava is entering the ocean at Kapoho Bay and producing a large laze plume. Heavy vog is blanketing the interior and southern parts of the island, impacting Hilo and wrapping around to Kona through the weekend. 

--

June 16, 4:22 p.m.

Civil Defense Authorities are advising people that official sources of information regarding the current East Rift Zone Eruption are obtained from agencies responsible for monitoring the volcano. Be aware of posters who speculate on the movement of active lava flows. This information has not been supported by official observations.  Radio messages from the Hawaii Civil Defense Agency, along with information on official government websites and social media platforms will continue to relay accurate and current eruption information. We encourage you to only act on officially released information

There is no immediate threat at this time. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory continues to closely monitor the eruption and works hand in hand with the Hawaii Civil Defense Agency to provide updates.

--

11:57 a.m.

A volcanic ash and vog community meeting will be held on Wednesday June 20th at 5:30 p.m. at Konawaena Elementary School cafeteria.

Have your questions answered by Department of Health representatives on air quality data, health effects of vog, and how to protect yourself from vog exposure.

--

June 15, 8:17 a.m.

Fissure 8 continues to produce a large channelized flow that is entering the ocean at Kapoho Bay and producing a large laze plume. Expect heavier vog to blanket the interior and southern parts of the island, wrapping around to Kona through the weekend.

Residents of Hawai‘i County who suffered damage or losses from the recent Kilauea volcanic eruption and earthquakes, can now register for disaster assistance with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

The following is provided for your information:

  • A Disaster Recovery Center (DRC), jointly operated by Hawaii County, the State of Hawaii, and FEMA will open today, at 8 a.m.
  • The DRC is located at Kea‘au High School Gymnasium and will be open daily from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm. 
  • People can register for assistance at the DRC, as well as having many of their questions answered.
  • FEMA, the U.S. Small Business Administration, and state and county government agencies will be present at the center.
  • For a list of the information you need to bring with you, or if you want to register online, go to www.DisasterAssistance.gov.

--

2:07 p.m.

Fissure 8 still fountaining about 200 feet high and feeding the flow into the ocean in Kapoho. There is still laze plume and areas of hot water.  Another small explosion occurred at summit around 3 a.m.  Fissure 16 & 18 are oozing lava. 

Drones are flying into the plume to take SO2 emission rates and collect data from the gas plume to see how changes in the gas equate to changes in the eruption.

When eruption first started, the lava was old stored magma, and some of the most chemically evolved/coolest lava.  10 Days after eruption, lava composition shifted to hotter newer lava that could move faster.  By May 21st, lava composition leveled out to the newer hotter lava. 

HDOT is starting repairs to Hwy 11 near Hawaii Volcanoes National Park starting next week. There will not be a closure, but crews will be directing traffic. 

--

June 14, 6 a.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that the eruption continues in the lower East Rift Zone. Fissure 8 continues to produce a large channelized flow that is entering the ocean at Kapoho Bay and producing a large laze plume. Gas emissions from the fissure eruption and at the ocean entry continue to be very high.  Hawaiian Volcano Observatory also reports that an ash explosion occurred at the Kilauea Summit early this morning, be aware of ash fallout throughout Ka’u.

Due to volcanic and air quality conditions, the following guidance is given:

  • The Department of Health recommends limiting outside activities and staying indoors if you have breathing issues.
  • You can monitor the latest air quality measurements through the University of Hawaii’s Vog Measurement and Prediction Project, through the line on our Civil Defense website.
  • A community meeting on volcanic ash and vog will be held today at 5:30 p.m. at the Ocean View Community Center.

Due to the current volcanic activity, the following policies are in effect:

  • Leilani Estates West of Pomaikai Street is open only to residents with official credentials.
  • There is no immediate threat, but residents in Leilani, Waa Waa, and Papaya Farms Road should heed warnings from Civil Defense officials and be prepared to evacuate with little notice.

The shelter at Pahoa Community Center is open and pet-friendly. The Keaau Armory shelter has reached capacity.  

--

3:00 p.m.

The Kalapana Solid Waste Transfer Station will resume collection on Saturday, June 16th. 

The National Weather Service reports light winds will bring vog inland and to the south, wrapping around to the Kona area.  The heavy vog conditions are expected to remain this way until the early part of next week.

--

6:00 a.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that the eruption continues in the lower East Rift Zone. Fissure 8 continues to produce a large channelized flow that is entering the ocean at Kapoho Bay and producing a large laze plume. Gas emissions from the fissure eruption and at the ocean entry continue to be very high.  Hawaiian Volcano Observatory also reports that a steam explosion occurred at the Kilauea Summit early this morning, be aware of ash fallout through Ka’u.

--

June 12, 2018, 12:00 a.m.

Workshops for residents whose employment status or businesses are affected by the current Kilauea eruption are planned for next week in Pahoa.

The workshops will offer information on  assistance programs and services, including unemployment insurance, state job vacancies, and rental housing help.

The meetings will be Tuesday June 19th at the Cooper Center in Volcano and the workshop on Wednesday June 20th will be held at Pahoa Community Center.

Both workshops are scheduled to run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

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