August 29, 5:00 p.m.

Kilauea summit and lower East Rift Zone

Seismicity remains low and ground deformation is negligible at the summit of Kilauea Volcano. Earthquakes, probably aftershocks of the magnitude-6.9 earthquake in early May, continue on South Flank faults. On the volcano's lower East Rift Zone (LERZ), no incandescence was visible in the fissure 8 cone nor was there any lava entering the ocean during this morning's overflight. Sulfur dioxide emission rates at both the summit and LERZ are drastically reduced; the combined rate is lower than at any time since late 2007. On Tuesday (8/21), the SO2 emissions from the LERZ were too low to measure although SO2 smells were noticed.

HVO crews are working to restore communication with several monitoring stations on the east side of the island that was disrupted by the passage of Hurricane/Tropical Storm Lane but the losses do not significantly reduce our ability to assess volcanic conditions. Whiteout conditions could occur on the new lava field due due to steam produced by heavy rainfall on still-hot lava flows.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) will continue to closely monitor Kilauea’s seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintain visual surveillance of the summit and LERZ as best we can. Ground and drone crews are in the field today but continue to be hampered by weather conditions.

HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed. The next update will be issued tomorrow morning unless significant changes occur.

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August 19, 1:13 p.m.

Kilauea summit and lower East Rift Zone

The lull in activity at Kilauea Volcano continues. At the summit, seismicity and deformation are negligible. On the lower East Rift Zone, the only incandescence is at the coast near Ahalanui where a few ocean entries are oozing lava. Sulfur dioxide emission rates at both the summit and LERZ are drastically reduced; the combined rate is lower than at any time since late 2007.

HVO Operations

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) will continue to closely monitor Kilauea’s seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintain visual surveillance of the summit and LERZ. 

The thunderstorms and heavy rains that drenched windward parts of the Big Island yesterday afternoon, Saturday, August 18, compromised several seismic stations and GPS receivers that are used to monitor earthquakes and ground deformation on Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes. HVO's monitoring network has many built-in redundancies, so real-time data acquisition was not compromised.

HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed. The next status report will be issued tomorrow morning unless significant changes occur.

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August 16, 7:23 a.m.

Activity at Kilauea's summit is still quiet after more than a week of no ash explosions. The most action is happening at a few ocean entry points, but there's no lava flowing in the Lower East Rift Zone.

While the eruption could intensify at any moment, right now, it isn't showing any signs of picking up. 

USGS scientists say, there was a three and half month pause during the Mauna Ulu eruption in 1971.

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August 15, 8:21 a.m.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that eruptive activity remains at reduced levels at Kilauea Summit and the lower east rift zone. Seismic activity at the summit continues to be low with few earthquakes. The lava pond in fissure 8 cone is mostly crusted over. Fissure 8, along with other fissures, continues to release gas. Lava continues to be reported oozing at several points along the Kapoho Bay and Ahalanui coastline creating a laze plume.

It is common for eruptions to go through periods of diminished output, or to pause completely, only to reactivate days or weeks later, or longer. Activity could occur at any time.  Residents should remain informed and heed Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

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August 14, 12:30 p.m.

Kilauea Volcano has remained quiet for over a week now, with no further collapse events at the summit, and, with the exception of a small, crusted-over pond of lava deep inside the fissure 8 cone and a few scattered ocean entries, no lava flowing in the lower East Rift Zone (LERZ).

Earthquake and deformation data show no net accumulation, withdrawal, or significant movement of subsurface magma or pressurization as would be expected if the system was building toward a resumption of activity.

It is too soon to tell if this change represents a temporary lull or the end of the LERZ eruption and/or summit collapse activity. In 1955, similar pauses of 5 and 16 days occurred during an 88-day-long LERZ eruption. During the Mauna Ulu eruption (1969-1974), a 3.5 month pause occurred in late 1971.

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August 13, 7:23 a.m.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that eruptive activity remains at reduced levels at Kilauea Summit and the lower east rift zone. Seismic activity at the summit is low with few earthquakes. The lava pond in Fissure 8 cone is mostly crusted over. Fissure 8 along with other fissures continue to release gas. Lava was reported oozing at several points along the Kapoho Bay and Ahalanui coastline creating a laze plume.

Although a lull in activity continues, it is common for eruptions to go through periods of diminished output, or to pause completely, only to reactivate days or weeks later, or longer. Activity could occur at any time.  Residents should remain informed and heed Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

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August 10, 9:12 a.m.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that eruptive activity remains at reduced levels at Kilauea Summit and the lower east rift zone from fissure 8. Seismic activity at the summit is low with few earthquakes. Field crews report a lava pond remains confined to fissure 8. HVO continues to monitor Kilauea for possible signs of reactivation.

The following guidelines remain in effect:

  • Do not access the flow field due to extreme hazard. Lava eruption could resume at any time.
  • Motorists on Highway 11 between the 28 and 32 mile marker are advised to stay on the pavement, be alert for changes in road conditions, and drive with caution.
  • The plates on Highway 130 are stable, motorists are reminded to slow down while traveling through the area.

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August 8, 7:30 a.m.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that eruptive activity remains minimal at Kilauea Summit and at the lower east rift zone from fissure 8. Seismic activity at the summit is low with few earthquakes. Field crews overnight report a lava pond confined to fissure 8. HVO continues to monitor Kilauea for possible signs of reactivation.

The Disaster Recovery Center, located at the Pahoa Community Center is closed today due to Hurricane Hector.

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August 6, 7:18 a.m.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that eruptive activity has deceased at the Kilauea summit and lower east rift eruption from fissure 8.  Seismic activity is low with few felt earthquakes at the summit.  Crews overnight in the lower east rift report only glow in fissure 8. 

HVO continues to monitor Kilauea for signs of reactivation of activity.  Several overflights are scheduled throughout the day to visually monitor the volcano.

Motorists on Highway 11 between the 28 and 32 mile marker are advised to stay on the pavement, be alert for changing roadway conditions, and drive with caution. Motorcyclists and bicyclists should proceed with extreme caution.

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August 4, 1:03 p.m.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the channel leading northeastward from the vent. No overflows were reported this morning. The lower lava channel adjacent to Kapoho cone shifted west about 0.25 km and is now feeding lava into the southwest sector of the lower flow field. Lava levels appear generally low in the channel which is incandescent at its surface to approximately 4.5 km (2.8 mi) from the vent; however, lava is still flowing farther beneath the crust to the vicinity of Kapoho Crater where it is seeping out of both sides of the channel, sometimes into adjacent vegetation starting small fires.

At the ocean entry, observers note the possible the southwestward migration of ooze-outs from the southwest portion of lava front, the northeast half of the flow’s ocean-front is inactive with no evidence of effusion into the ocean. The Pohoiki boat ramp is intact this morning. 

No other fissures are active this morning. 

Pele's hair and other lightweight volcanic glass fragments from the lava fountain at Fissure 8 continue to fall downwind of the fissure, dusting the ground within a few hundred meters (yards) of the vent. High winds may waft lighter particles to greater distances. Residents are urged to minimize exposure to these volcanic particles, which can cause skin and eye irritation similar to volcanic ash.

The most recent map of lava flows can be found at https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html 

HVO field crews are on site tracking activity as conditions allow and are reporting information to Hawaii County Civil Defense. Observations are also collected on a daily basis from cracks in the area of Highway 130; no significant changes in temperature, crack width, or gas emissions have been noted for several days.

Volcanic gas emissions remain very high. VOG information can be found at https://vog.ivhhn.org/

The ocean entry is a hazardous area. The interaction of lava with the ocean creates "laze", a corrosive seawater plume laden with hydrochloric acid and fine volcanic particles that drifts downwind and can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs. Close to the ocean entry, flying debris from explosive interaction between lava and water is a primary hazard. Additionally, submarine magma-water interaction can result in explosive activity beyond the visible lava delta, creating a hazard that extends offshore. The lava delta is unstable because it is built up to 800 m (0.5 mi) from the former coastline on unconsolidated lava fragments and sand. This loose material can easily be eroded away by surf, causing the new land to become unsupported and slide into the sea. 

Magma continues to be supplied to the Lower East Rift Zone. Seismicity remains relatively low although higher amplitude tremor is occasionally being recorded on seismic stations close to the ocean entry.

Additional ground cracking and outbreaks of lava in the area of the active fissures are possible at any time. Residents downslope of the region of fissures should remain informed and heed all Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

Kilauea Volcano Middle East Rift Zone

A white plume, assumed to be mostly steam with minor SO2 emission, has been issuing from Pu?u ?O?o nearly continuously for the past few weeks but there's no sign of volcanic activity.

Kilauea Volcano Summit

The most recent collapse event occurred two day ago, at 11:55 a.m. HST August 2, and was similar in character and magnitude to previous events. Seismicity at the summit has been elevated to 30 earthquakes per hour over the past day. Inward slumping of the rim and walls of Halema?uma?u continues.

Sulfur dioxide emissions from the volcano's summit are very low. This gas and minor amounts of ash resuspended by wind are being transported downwind. Small bursts of ash and gas may coincide with the summit collapse events. The summit region is occasionally impacted by sulfur dioxide from the lower East Rift Zone eruption.

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August 3, 12:47 p.m.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the channel leading northeastward from the vent. Multiple overflows developed late yesterday afternoon and evening, one of which headed north toward Noni Farms Road, starting a small fire. Field crews determined the advancing overflow had ceased by 21:00 HST but that fires were still burning. Further downstream overflows were concentrated in the wide lava field west and south-southwest of Kapoho cone, also igniting small fires in adjacent vegetation.

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August 2, 8:10 a.m.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports earthquakes continue at the Kilauea Summit.  Fissure 8 continues to erupt sending lava flows into the ocean at Ahalanui; creating a large laze plume. 

State Highways reports no new cracks on Highway 11, but request motorists stay on the pavement and be alert for changes in roadway conditions between mile markers 28 and 32.

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3:56 p.m.

HVO reports that earthquakes continue at Kilauea summit and fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel, sending flows to the ocean at Ahalanui and creating a large laze plume. No overflows were reported this morning. The margin of the flow at the ocean entry has not advanced and remains approximately 500 feet from the Pohoiki boat ramp.

State Highways reports no new cracks on Highway 11 after the 8:00 a.m. collapse event at Halemaumau crater. Between mile marker 28 and 32, motorists are advised to stay on the pavement, be alert for changing roadway conditions, and drive with caution. Motorcyclists and bicyclists should proceed with extreme caution.

**Reminder: There will not be a test of the Outdoor Warning Siren System for the month of August. Testing will resume Tuesday, September 4, 2018.**

The following guidelines remain in effect:

  • Check all utility connections of water, gas, and electricity for potential damage from earthquake activity.
  • Do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard. Be aware that channel overflows and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field.
  • The ocean entry continues to produce a laze plume. Take precautions and stay out of the plume to avoid exposure to hydrochloric acid and glass particles, which can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawaii County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption.

  • The Disaster Recovery Center has moved and is now at the Pahoa Community Center, located at 15-3022 Kauhale street, Pahoa. Hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays.
  • Access placards are available at the Civil Defense office located at 920 Ululani Street in Hilo.

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July 31, 1:48 p.m.

Around eight Tuesday morning, parts of the crater wall collapsed. That movement was equivalent to a magnitude 5.4 earthquake.Another movement around 12:30 Tuesday morning equivalent to a magnitude 4.5 earthquake shook the summit. No tsunami threat.

At the coast, the south edge of the lava flow has not advanced westward in the past day, and remains less than 175 m (0.1 mi) from the Pohoiki boat ramp in Isaac Hale Park.

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4:48 p.m. 

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that earthquakes continue at Kilauea summit and fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel, sending flows to the ocean at Ahalanui and creating a large laze plume. This morning, HVO field crews report low lava levels in the channel and no overflows. The margin of the flow at the ocean entry has not advanced and remains approximately 500 feet from the Pohoiki boat ramp.

State Highways reports no new cracks on Highway 11, but requests motorists between mile marker 28 and 32 stay on the pavement, be alert for changing roadway conditions, and drive with caution. Motorcyclists and bicyclists should proceed with extreme caution.

**Note: Tomorrow, July 31, from 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm, Hawaii Police Department will be shutting down Highway 11 between Kukui Camp Road and North Kulani Road in Mountain View for investigative purposes. No traffic will be allowed in either direction during this time.**

The following guidelines remain in effect:

  • Check all utility connections of water, gas, and electricity for potential damage from earthquake activity.
  • Do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard. Be aware that channel overflows and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field.
  • The ocean entry continues to produce a laze plume. Take precautions and stay out of the plume to avoid exposure to hydrochloric acid and glass particles, which can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawaii County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption.

  • The Disaster Recovery Center has moved and is now at the Pahoa Community Center, located at 15-3016 Kauhale St., Pahoa. Hours of operation are 8 am to 6 pm weekdays and 8 am to 4 pm on Saturdays.
  • Access placards are available at the Civil Defense office located at 920 Ululani Street in Hilo.

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July 30, 7:21 a.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports a 4.1 magnitude occurred on the south flank of Kilauea last night just after 10 PM that was felt as far away as Kalapana to Hilo. No damage was reported. 

Fissure 8 continues to erupt into the channel sending lava flows into the ocean at Ahalanui, creating a large laze plume. HVO field crews report fluctuations in the channel level with spillovers occurring locally along the channel. 

Yesterday’s flyover reports the margin of the flow remains approximately 500 feet from the Pohoiki Boat Ramp at Isaac Hale Park with the main ocean entry approximately 0.75 miles northeast of Pohoiki Boat Ramp.

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July 27, 11:58 a.m.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel, sending flows to the ocean at Ahalanui and creating a large laze plume. HVO field crews report fluctuations in the channel level with small overflows occurring in the upper portion of the channel continued overnight.

As of yesterday’s overflight, the western margin of the flow near Pohoiki has not advanced significantly westward so the flow remains approximately 500 feet from the Pohoiki boat ramp in Isaac Hale Park.

State Highways requests motorists on Highway 11 between mile marker 28 and 32 stay on the pavement and be alert for changing roadway conditions.

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July 26, 11:50 a.m.

Lava is now about 450 feet away from Pohoiki Boat Ramp in Issac Hale Park. 

USGS officials say the flow appears to be slowing down, but it is still unpredictable.

Relatives of Isaac Hale tell Island News they hope the area, including Hale's home, will be spared.

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