Insurance report ranks Honolulu low on safe driver ranking

Allstate places Honolulu as 128 out of 200 cities for car collision frequency

Published  9:37 AM HST Aug 27, 2013

Thought driving around town was bad? Well now there is even more evidence that such a claim is more fact than opinion.

In an annual report titled "Allstate America's Best Drivers Report", the insurance company ranked Honolulu as 128 out of 200 cities for having the "safest drivers."

That ranking is based on Allstate claims data for frequency of car collisions. That uses the average length of time between car collisions as a indicator of how safe those drivers are operating.

According to the report, the average driver in Honolulu will experience a car collision every 8.7 years which is about 15 percent more likely than the national average of about every 10 years.

So what cities scored the best ranking?

At the top of the list is Fort Collins, CO with an average of 13.9 years between collisions. Boise, ID was a close second with a similar average and Sioux Falls, SD was a distant third with 12.8 years.

To provide some perspective on those numbers, the top ten cities in this report all have populations over 127,000 (based on recent population estimates). Yet, the city that has the closest population to Honolulu (around 390,000) was Madison, Wisconsin (about 240,000).

However, ranked number 11 on the list was Mesa, Arizona with a population estimated at about 452,000.

The population of Oahu island is approaching one million.

The worst cities outlined in this report included: Providence, Baltimore and Washington D.C. (in descending order).

The report also cited a statistic from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration that stated that car crash fatalities jumped by more than 1,700 from 2011 to 2012. They say that marks the first year-to-year increase in fatalities since 2005.

Allstate's report provides another statistic stating that 70 percent of cars involved in car crash claims were considered drivable following the crash. That indicates that most crash claims were the result of collisions below 35 miles an hour.

This is the ninth annual edition of this report, which ranks the 200 largest cities in the U.S.

Find the full report here.

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