Antique Alley to close its doors by end of May

25-year-old shop loses its lease

 UPDATED 8:01 PM HST May 20, 2013
HONOLULU -

For more than two decades, it's been the place to go to find the long lost artifacts that are part of Hawaii history.

But after losing their lease, the owners of Antique Alley are closing up shop at the end of the month.

In this store, one man's trash is another's connection to the past.

When you walk into shop, you realize there's not much Pake Zane doesn’t collect.
And just about everything in his shop has a story -- we're talking hundreds of thousands of items here.

"Because everything here has been saved by somebody else, and then disposed of by somebody else and I feel it shouldn’t go to the landfill," said Zane.

"Cultural recycling" is what Zane calls what he's been doing for nearly all his life.

"This is just another form of recycling.  It’s all the cultural artifacts that relate to us growing up in Hawaii," said Zane.

For 25 years, Antique Alley has been the one-stop shop for quirky collectibles and vintage Hawaiiana.

But after losing their lease, they now have only until the end of May.

"As I understand it, there’s somebody else in the building who wants to expand.  So we’ve been asked to leave.  I understand, they can pay a lot more than we can.  But I was just upset about the manner in which it took place," said Zane.

Zane and his wife, Julie Lauster, opened the store on Kapiolani Boulevard after traveling around the world for 11 years.

With the rise of the digital age, he saw a need to preserve the pieces that make up our memories of Hawaii.

"I never liked history in school because you can’t relate to it.  But since getting into this, I thrive on local history," said Zane.

On June 1, Zane plans to pack up what he can and close up shop.

"We’ll put everything into storage and take a break, which Julie and I haven’t had in many, many years," said Zane.

He hopes to reopen, but for now history is for sale until it's time to go.

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